3 Things To Always And Never Do In Leadership

“I will NEVER be that kind of leader.”

“I will ALWAYS lead with the utmost integrity in my church.”

We’ve all heard it said, “Never say ALWAYS or NEVER.” ¬†And I think there is some wisdom in that. ¬†These words can easily set us up for major failure.

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In the right context, however, ALWAYS and NEVER can be incredibly useful for staying focused and intentional with who we desire to become and what we hope to accomplish in the future.

Here are 3 things I suggest we ALWAYS and NEVER do in leadership:

1. ALWAYS do your best | Our work effort should be high and directed toward God (Col. 3:23).  This also creates solid character.

2. ALWAYS forgive yourself when you fail | You and I are going to fail. ¬†It’s inevitable. ¬†But if we don’t learn from our mistakes, give ourselves grace and move on…we will end up self-destructing. ¬†Give each new day a clean slate (Lam. 3:22-23).

3. ALWAYS look for the good in everyone | Noticing the positive traits in others (and acknowledging them) encourages and builds others up. ¬†Who doesn’t need more of that? ¬†This also changes the way we view people for the better.


1. NEVER Give up | You and I lose sight of our goals, hopes, dreams, and reason for living when we give up (1 Cor. 9:24).  When you feel like giving up, seek a mentor immediately.  Work through it with someone.

2. NEVER neglect your priorities | Relationship with Jesus, family, personal health, rest, and growth.  These are some of examples.  Whatever yours are, keep them in front of you at all times (Luke 12:34).  Examine them to see how you are doing.

3. NEVER lose sight of your calling | This one helps us to avoid giving up.  Whatever God has called you to, do it well (Eph. 4:1).  He believes in you.

What would you add to this list?

Join the discussion and leave a comment below.

4 Ways To Embrace Failure

How does failure affect you?

Every new venture has the potential to succeed or fail. ..BUT only if you actually take a risk.  This is very true for churches when they launch their first multisite campus as well.  Nine months since our launch and the lessons continue to flood in weekly.

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Recently, our streaming video teaching failed in a BIG way! ¬†So I thought I’d write about it (insert smirk). ¬†What exactly happened and why is less important than actually taking steps to ensure that this virtually does’t¬†happen again. ¬†Our team got together during the week, collaborated, and agreed on a process. ¬†All I can say is that the next campus our church launches should be much better off as a result of the lessons we’ve learned.

So, what are we to do when things go wrong…whether we caused it or not? ¬†The choice is up to you and I.

Here are 4 ways to EMBRACE failure.

1) ¬†Expect it | What we can see coming (to a degree) prepares us to better deal with it mentally when it hits. ¬†It’s like a warning. ¬†And I’m not talking about pessimism either. ¬†Reality and experience teach us that failures are a part of life.

2) ¬†Don’t fear it | Fear can keep us from taking future risks. ¬†Fear screams, “Don’t even try that!” ¬†Here’s the thing, fear of failure crowns complacency as King. ¬†We don’t want that.

3) ¬†Learn from it | Failures not learned from are usually repeated. ¬†If you continue to stub your toe on the same item when you get up in the middle of the night to use the restroom, don’t you eventually move that item? ¬†Learning usually requires some level¬†of adjustment. ¬†Leaders who don’t learn from their failures fail to grow.

4) ¬†Share it | Grab a huge piece of humble pie, own your “Well that didn’t go as I had hoped” moment, and help others to grow their leadership from your experience. ¬†Most of the incredibly helpful leaders I have learned from in the past 20 years of ministry realized that sharing their personal mishaps actually helps further Kingdom work. ¬†It offers hindsight to younger, less experienced leaders.

In a recent interview, Jon Acuff¬†said, “I like the 39 year old me better than the 29 year old me, and I hope the 49 year old me feels the same.”

I think that can apply to leaders too. ¬†Think about it. ¬†Ten years from now don’t you hope to be a stronger leader than you are today?

Leave a comment below.  I would love to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

 

Do You ‘Know’ You’re Singing Out Loud?

gymAre you as amused as I am at the things we often observe at the gym?

I started back at a regular exercise routine today. ¬†It was just me in our little fitness room at our apartment complex until I was wrapping up. ¬†I noticed a man enter the gym and go right to the treadmill. ¬†Both of us had earbuds in (I was on the stationary bike). Then, I couldn’t believe what I heard. ¬†I had to mute my music to be sure. ¬†That guy was not only getting his groove on, but he was singing out loud to his tunes! (not exactly male vocalist of the year)

This made me wonder two things.

1)  Does he realize I can hear him?

2) ¬†Does he know he can’t sing?

Given the situation, I would assume he would answer YES to both questions.

This entire 10 minute event made me realize something about our leadership in the Church.

Р Whether we are intentionally leading or not, someone is always watching us.  Good or bad, others are constantly learning from our actions and lifestyle.

Р Knowing our weakest abilities as a leader and still trying to develop those skills is so important.  To try something with a high chance that we might fail or embarrass ourselves models humility to those we are leading.

– ¬†Finally, enjoy the journey. ¬†Above all the success, failure, frustration, and victory…try to enjoy church leadership any way possible.

Ministry work is a huge calling.  Enjoy it and pace yourself, or it might just break you.