#RaceTogether

Not everyone has a strong opinion on this. ¬†And those who do seem to clearly be in one of two ‘general’¬†camps on Twitter.

1) ¬†“Starbucks is in the coffee business, so stick to coffee and stop trying to force your agenda on society.” ¬†Note: many tweeting this sentiment hate coffee anyway.

2) ¬†“Good for them. ¬†This is a topic we need to be openly discussing more in America. ¬†It’s going to take a little discomfort to develop healthier diversity in our country.”

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My cup today

Personally, I find myself in a third group on the issue.  And it really begs a BIGGER question:

“Is Starbucks or Social Media really the best place to

have this discussion?”

I would suggest the answer is NO! ¬†And here’s why I say that.

Churches in America should be having this talk.  They should be the ones initiating the discussion, both within their congregations and in their local communities.  This is a leadership issue.  Can it get messy and uncomfortable?  Yes.  Will the result be circles of hugs and everyone singing Kumbaya?  Not likely.

If you’re a church leader, please hear this. ¬†Of all the places to talk about race, ethnicity and nationality…the Church should be the safest and most authentic place to do this. ¬†If it isn’t then I would suggest that we have some work to do in the areas of integrity and character.

I’ll end with this.

As I write this I’m sitting in a Starbucks located in the deep South. ¬†I have seen Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians all gathering for coffee and community. ¬†And you know what? ¬†We all seemed to get along just fine.

Why shouldn’t we try to cultivate a similar environment in our churches? ¬†We should be able to worship, serve, and learn together. ¬†Why is this not very common?

I could really care less about Starbucks starting the recent hashtag trend.  It will fade away eventually.  But the Church would be wise to adopt the discussion as a normal and healthy part of growing together in the family of God.

 

Please leave a comment below. ¬†Who’s doing this well and what can we learn from them?